Sunday , September 15 2019
Home / australia / How brutal rape on children could have happened

How brutal rape on children could have happened



When the confused parents noticed that they had not seen the seven-year-old girl for 15 minutes in South Sydney in the dance studio on November 15 last year, everyone decided to go in and help find her.

Which of those concerned parents, Nicola Gilio – whose child was dancing with his friends at that time – discovered when he checked the toilet on the first floor of the Arena building in Kogarah, which would probably be there forever.

His friends told news.com.au at the time that good-natured Sydney dad was "with physical and emotional scars" after he kicked in the toilet door and saw what was going on inside.

After seeing the missing young girl in a box with 55-year-old condemned violator Anthony Peter Sampieri, who choked her to surrender at the point of the knife and raped her, he put his life on the line.

A frenzied battle broke out when he and the dentist Jeffrey Stack, whose dental office is in the same building, tried to save the little girl.

He felt the sharp pain of the blade sinking into his stomach and kicked his neck during the quarrel.

The girl's mother was also cut into her arm when she reached out to protect her child, but fortunately Mr. Stack, a former amateur boxer, hit Sampieri's head and knocked him down.

It was a night that even those who could only hear the shaking cries from the damp cabin would never forget.

This week, Sampieri pleaded guilty to three charges of raping a girl while holding her in captivity – bringing the child's family to justice.

But how this disturbing crime has ever been allowed is deeply controversial – given that Sampieri was on conditional release at the time of the incident but did not have a GPS monitor on him.

After five years of conviction for seven years for raping a 60-year-old woman at home in Illawarra in his home in Illawarra, he was released.

And one month before the attack, it was revealed that Sampieri had been called to the police station to question him about the alleged harassment and the menacing phone he had done to the woman.

News.com.au revealed the exclusive details of the disgusting connections that Sampieri gave to two women in Wollongong in 2012.

Calling himself "Ron", it is believed that Sampieri followed at least one of them home and fearing that he is a sexual pervert, whose behavior has intensified, one woman called the police.

In one phone call, Sampieri asked the woman, "Can I put the language in your ***** e?".

In another appeal to a separate woman, Sampieri was offensive, and language graphics, as he described a lewd sexual act that he would like to perform on her.

Because the details of Sampieri's behavior were revealed in many media, NSW Police Minister Troy Grant said that the whole discussion had made him "cheat".

He promised, however, that "there would be answers" about how Sampieri could go to Kogarah dance studio without control, waving his scalpel.

As part of the response hunt, senior police constable NSW, 31-year-old Andrew Michael Bruce, was accused in April of four cases of negligence. He did not plead all charges.

It is alleged that on October 26 last year, a woman complained to the St George police station about an offensive call from Sampieri – which led to summoning the convicted rapist to the station for an interview.

Const Bruce allegedly searched Sampieri's name on the computer system and discovered that he had a red flag because he was conditionally released.

However, Const Bruce allegedly did not get criminal history in the system nor did he communicate it to the community – which means that Sampieri could free himself, despite breaking the release condition, just a few weeks before the attack in the dance studio.

Const Bruce pleaded not guilty for four cases of negligence, and his attorney Warwick Anderson told reporters that his client "turned his life upside down and did everything in his power."

Sampieri's attack provoked a political war on the words, as former opposition leader NSW, Michael Daley, called for a pan-European review of parole and more money for the police.

He said you can not blame the failure of the entire one officer system.

"The police are doing an amazing job tracking some of the most dangerous criminals in our society, but they can not do it with one hand tied behind their backs," he said in a statement shortly after the attack.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian admitted in the parliament that mistakes had been made.

"On this occasion, committing a mistake could lead to the most terrible situation and we deeply, deeply apologize to all those affected," she told Parliament.

Sampieri, the 25-year-old son of Sampieri, said Daniel, as the attack continued The Daily Telegraph his father was "save money" and "he died better".

"I hope he feels he has done what he has done, but he is beyond saving … he has been abusing heroin and ice for too long," he said.

"There is no cure for someone like that. It is better to be dead, and the sooner you die in prison, the better. "

Bearded Sampieri appeared via video in a central court in Sydney from custody because his attorney Penny Musgrave had made charges on his behalf.

During the court's speech he gave short answers "it's true", "yes" and "OK", because the peace judge Robert Williams obliged him to be sentenced in the county court in Downing Center on June 21.

Sampieri is to appear again via the video link.

The court heard some of the facts in dispute and the agreed information sheet will be filed with the district court.

Sampieri also has 29 allegations of making dangerous calls in weeks before the attack in the dance studio.

He is to appear before the Central Municipal Court on 10 July in these cases and on June 21 he was posted to the local court in Downing Center.

Const Bruce is currently suspended for compensation, and his case will return to court on August 8.

If this story has raised concerns for you or someone you know, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit lifeline.org.au or the Infoline for children at 1800 551 800.


Source link