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China has built antennas five times bigger than New York



China has completed the construction of a secret antenna FIVE times greater than New York after 13 years in the face of fears that radio waves can cause CANCER and communicate with submarines

  • Extremely low radio waves (ELF waves) generated by the machine
  • Experimental radio antennas reportedly lasted 13 years
  • The exact location of the antenna remains a mystery – even for researchers
  • WHO claims that ELF affects human nerves and stimulates synaptic transmissions
  • It was also previously disclosed that ELF waves are "probably carcinogenic to humans"

Joe Pinkstone For Mailonline

China has completed the construction of a secret project to build a gigantic antenna five times greater than New York.

Experimental radio antennas reportedly lasted 13 years and will communicate long distances with military submarines.

Very low frequency radio waves (ELF waves) will be emitted by a machine that sends messages to sub-hundreds of meters underwater.

The design of the wireless electromagnetic method (WEM) is officially associated with the detection of earthquakes and minerals, but has clear potential applications for the army.

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China has completed the construction of a secret project to build a gigantic antenna five times greater than New York. Experimental radio antennas reportedly had 13 years to finish and will communicate long distances with military submarines (photo from file)

China has completed the construction of a secret project to build a gigantic antenna five times greater than New York. Experimental radio antennas reportedly had 13 years to finish and will communicate long distances with military submarines (photo from file)

China has completed the construction of a secret project to build a gigantic antenna five times greater than New York. Experimental radio antennas reportedly had 13 years to finish and will communicate long distances with military submarines (photo from file)

China has been intensively applying ELF technology for some time, and the facility, which is located on a 1400 km2 patch of land, is the culmination of this technology.

The WEM project consists of a pair of high-voltage lines that intersect with a 100-kilometer steel grille in the entire region.

Each power line is terminated with an underground dock for two power plants and generators that electrify the ground.

This process produces electromagnetic radiation capable of passing thousands of kilometers through the air or through the earth's crust.

WHAT IS ELF WAVES?

Waves with extremely low frequency (ELF) are generated in the range of 0.1 to 30 Hz.

They are unlikely to cause damage because they are low on energy and have huge wavelengths.

Huge waves allow the transmission of information over a long distance.

It is estimated that the machine has a range of 3500 km, and signals closer to the source will be stronger than signals received further.

The Department of the World Health Organization has previously revealed that ELF waves are "probably carcinogenic to humans".

WHO claims that the ELF field affects human nerves and stimulates synaptic transmission.

It is also believed that it changes the retinal cells, generating a flash of light.

Huang Zhiwei, a professor from the electrical engineering department at Nanhua University in Hengyang, Hunan, said the ELF radio probably will not cause serious damage to the human body due to the huge wavelength that can extend over thousands of kilometers.

The researcher also confessed that he could interfere with sense organs.

Scientists say ELF signals will be generated at a frequency of 0.1 to 30 Hz and can be detected for ships submerged hundreds of meters below the waves.

The Chinese authorities have not provided the exact location of the facility to the public, but it is believed to be located in the Huazhong region, an area in central China that includes the provinces of Hubei, Henan and Hunan.

The Chinese authorities have not provided the exact location of the facility to the public, but it is believed to be located in the Huazhong region, an area in central China that includes the provinces of Hubei, Henan and Hunan.

The Chinese authorities have not provided the exact location of the facility to the public, but it is believed to be located in the Huazhong region, an area in central China that includes the provinces of Hubei, Henan and Hunan.

China has been intensively applying ELF technology for some time, and the facility, which is located on a 1400 km2 patch of land, is the culmination of this technology.

China has been intensively applying ELF technology for some time, and the facility, which is located on a 1400 km2 patch of land, is the culmination of this technology.

China has been intensively applying ELF technology for some time, and the facility, which is located on a 1400 km2 patch of land, is the culmination of this technology.

The Chinese authorities have not provided the exact location of the facility to the public, but it is believed to be located in the Huazhong region, an area in central China that includes the provinces of Hubei, Henan and Hunan.

One of the scientists involved in the project from the Institute of Geology, China Earthquake Administration, said South China Morning Post: "This facility will have important military applications if war breaks out.

"Although I'm involved in the project, I have no idea where it is. It should work now.

It is believed that the project is based on previous successes of another similar project that was completed in 2009.

His first Super Low Frequency military grade transmission station was completed in 2009 and she managed to contact the sunken submarine a year later.

According to scientists and sources close to the topic, military applications of this technology are not the only application of this machine.

It is able to use its long wavelengths to identify and study mineral and oil deposits.

ELF waves can be manipulated to detect specific rock deformations that can help to identify earthquake precursors.

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