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Rugby World Cup: Steve Hansen's stability versus Eddie Jones' maverick methods



The stability of the All Blacks management or the maverick methods of Eddie Jones? It's a fascinating contrast that may ultimately decide this Rugby World Cup in Japan.

New Zealand have a proven track record under the steady hand of Steve Hansen. England are looking to atone for their last World Cup disaster by using Jones' volatile approach.

The times has chosen to highlight the differing methods as the tournament settles in on the back of an exciting opening stanza led by New Zealand's impressive triumph over the Springboks, the first true heavyweight contest.

Aaron Smith shows the sense of security All Blacks players have with their long-term coach Steve Hansen.

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Aaron Smith shows the sense of security All Blacks players have with their long-term coach Steve Hansen.

"Who has been the best team so far? The All Blacks. And who has the most settled coaching unit? The All Blacks. Coming in a close second on both counts and contributing to the theory that continuity is king: Ireland," he wrote Times rugby correspondent Owen Slot.

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He noted the late coaching changes forced on contenders Wales and South Africa and the merry-go-round system of Jones with his English assistants.

England coach Eddie Jones has taken a different approach to the All Blacks, sometimes solo and constantly changing his assistants.

GETTY IMAGES

England coach Eddie Jones has taken a different approach to the All Blacks, sometimes solo and constantly changing his assistants.

Against that was the rock solid All Blacks staffing that had seen Hansen, his scrum coach Mike Cron, mental skills coach Gilbert Enoka, and manager Darren Shand, celebrate their double century of tests together on the eve of this year's Rugby Championship.

They had been in the New Zealand mix since 2004, surviving a 2007 World Cup disaster and winning the next two titles in New Zealand and England.

Ian Foster had been with them since 2012, selector Grant Fox has longevity, and "new" defense coach Scott McLeod has been involved for two years.

The All Blacks management watch their team during the Rugby World Cup opener against South Africa in Japan.

GETTY IMAGES

The All Blacks management watch their team during the Rugby World Cup opener against South Africa in Japan.

"This is the epitome of settled management." The times said, aligning it to the successful reign of Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United.

"What does continuity achieve? It gives players a sense of security. It ensures that best practice is retained and handed down. It allows the coaches the opportunity to learn and improve on the job."

They said "the most extreme opponent of the All Blacks way" is England's Jones.

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The boys in black take on Canada at Oita Stadium on October 2.

"Jones does not believe in continuity. He does not like the idea of ​​giving players a sense of security because he fears complacency; he likes players to be on edge. He distrusts long-term coaching teams, too," The times said, wirth Jones fearing "cutting edge methods become blunt".

Jones valued fresh voices and new ideas, resulting in "an unusually high turnovers of staff".

"He is a rapacious hirer-and-firer. Some leave of their own accord," wrote Slot, noting that just 13 months ago Jones' coaching team was without an attack of defense coach.

"This is the England coaching team, together for a year, versus the All Blacks, together for 15. There is one orthodox approach, here, that has been proven right over and over in business and in sport, and then there is Jones. "

The next six weeks would tell who was right.


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