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Mild activity, walking, reduces the risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women



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According to the findings published in JAMA network is open.

"Our study found that mild physical activity and walking were associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older women" Dr. Michael J. LaMonte, MPH, wrote an associate professor at the department of epidemiology and environmental health at the University of Buffalo in New York. "This is an important and relatively new discovery. Until now, there was insufficient evidence to support the recommendation of less intensive activities under public health guidelines. If other studies confirm our results showing that light intensity is associated with the benefit of fracture, there may be a basis for future guidelines. "

LaMonte et al. Analyzed data on 77,206 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 who participated in the Women's Health Initiative in 1993–1998 at 40 American clinical centers (average age, 63 years; 85.6% white; 8.4% with osteoporosis; 3.9% of prescribed osteoporosis therapies). Women reported physical activity and a sedentary lifestyle, such as the number of days per week and the time (minutes) of usual mild, moderate and exhaustive recreational physical activity. Researchers summarized physical activity as energy expenditure, calculated as the product of the metabolic equivalent intensity (MET) value for each activity multiplied by the number of hours per week of participation reported or the number of MET hours per week. Standard MET values ​​were assigned to mild (3 MET), moderate (4.5 MET) and strenuous (7 MET) activity, as well as four walking speeds, heavy housework and yard work. Researchers followed the participants for results until September 2015, and used Cox's proportional threat models to estimate HR for the relationship between physical activity and incident fracture.

X-ray of the hip fracture 2019.

Regular, weekly physical activity, such as walking and working in the yard, can reduce the risk of hip fracture or total fracture in postmenopausal women.

Source: Adobe Stock

During the mean follow-up of 14 years, 25,316 women (33.1%) reported at least one fracture.

Compared with inactive women, defined as 0 MET hours per week, HR for complete fracture was 0.94 for women with less than 7.5 hours MET per week (95% CI, 0.9-0.98), 0, 95 for women with 7.5 to 17.7 hours of MET per week (95% CI, 0.91-0.99) and 0.94 for women with over 17.7 hours of MET per week (95% CI, 0, 9-0,98). Women with the highest total level of physical activity were 18% less likely to have a hip fracture during follow-up compared to inactive women (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95). Women were also less likely to experience a hip fracture when observed with walking at 'fairly high' speeds (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78-0.98), mild activity (HR = 0.82; 95% CI) , 0.73-0.93), moderate to intense activity (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96) and work in the yard (HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0, 82-0.99) compared to inactive women.

Total physical activity greater than 17.7 hours MET weekly was positively associated with a knee fracture vs. inactivity (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.5), while mild activity was associated with a lower risk of clinical vertebral fracture (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0 , 96) and total fractures (HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87-0.94). Moderate to intense activity was positively associated with a wrist or forearm fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.15).

In analyzes of non-reactive activity, researchers found that more than 6 hours of MET per week in the yard were associated with a lower risk of total fractures (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98) and femoral neck fractures ( HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.82-0.99) compared to work in the yard.

In age-adjusted analyzes assessed in a sitting position, 9.5 hours of daily sitting or lying down was associated with a higher risk of hip fracture (HR = 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.21), vertebral fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17) and complete fracture (HR = 1.1; 95% CI, 1.07-1.13).

"Current results suggest that lower-intensity exercises, including walking and non-recreational activities, can have a positive effect on the risk of fractures in old age," the researchers wrote. "If this is confirmed, future recommendations for fracture prevention in postmenopausal women should promote light physical activity, especially for the weak and unable to safely perform more intensive activities. A sedentary lifestyle as an independent factor predisposing a person to fracture requires further research. "- Regina Schaffer

disclosures: The authors do not report any significant financial disclosures.

According to the findings published in JAMA network is open.

"Our study found that mild physical activity and walking were associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in older women" Dr. Michael J. LaMonte, MPH, wrote an associate professor at the department of epidemiology and environmental health at the University of Buffalo in New York. "This is an important and relatively new discovery. Until now, there was insufficient evidence to support the recommendation of less intensive activities under public health guidelines. If other studies confirm our results showing that light intensity is associated with the benefit of fracture, there may be a basis for future guidelines. "

LaMonte et al. Analyzed data on 77,206 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 who participated in the Women's Health Initiative in 1993–1998 at 40 American clinical centers (average age, 63 years; 85.6% white; 8.4% with osteoporosis; 3.9% of prescribed osteoporosis therapies). Women reported physical activity and a sedentary lifestyle, such as the number of days per week and the time (minutes) of usual mild, moderate and exhaustive recreational physical activity. Researchers summarized physical activity as energy expenditure, calculated as the product of the metabolic equivalent intensity (MET) value for each activity multiplied by the number of hours per week of participation reported or the number of MET hours per week. Standard MET values ​​were assigned to mild (3 MET), moderate (4.5 MET) and strenuous (7 MET) activity, as well as four walking speeds, heavy housework and yard work. Researchers followed the participants for results until September 2015, and used Cox's proportional threat models to estimate HR for the relationship between physical activity and incident fracture.

X-ray of the hip fracture 2019.

Regular, weekly physical activity, such as walking and working in the yard, can reduce the risk of hip fracture or total fracture in postmenopausal women.

Source: Adobe Stock

During the mean follow-up of 14 years, 25,316 women (33.1%) reported at least one fracture.

Compared with inactive women, defined as 0 MET hours per week, HR for complete fracture was 0.94 for women with less than 7.5 hours MET per week (95% CI, 0.9-0.98), 0, 95 for women with 7.5 to 17.7 hours of MET per week (95% CI, 0.91-0.99) and 0.94 for women with over 17.7 hours of MET per week (95% CI, 0, 9-0,98). Women with the highest total level of physical activity were 18% less likely to have a hip fracture during follow-up compared to inactive women (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95). Women were also less likely to experience a hip fracture when observed with walking at 'fairly high' speeds (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78-0.98), mild activity (HR = 0.82; 95% CI) , 0.73-0.93), moderate to intense activity (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96) and work in the yard (HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0, 82-0.99) compared to inactive women.

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Total physical activity greater than 17.7 hours MET weekly was positively associated with a knee fracture vs. inactivity (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.5), while mild activity was associated with a lower risk of clinical vertebral fracture (HR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0 , 96) and total fractures (HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87-0.94). Moderate to intense activity was positively associated with a wrist or forearm fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.15).

In analyzes of non-reactive activity, researchers found that more than 6 hours of MET per week in the yard were associated with a lower risk of total fractures (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98) and femoral neck fractures ( HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.82-0.99) compared to work in the yard.

In age-adjusted analyzes assessed in a sitting position, 9.5 hours of daily sitting or lying down was associated with a higher risk of hip fracture (HR = 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.21), vertebral fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17) and complete fracture (HR = 1.1; 95% CI, 1.07-1.13).

"Current results suggest that lower-intensity exercises, including walking and non-recreational activities, can have a positive effect on the risk of fractures in old age," the researchers wrote. "If this is confirmed, future recommendations for fracture prevention in postmenopausal women should promote light physical activity, especially for the weak and unable to safely perform more intensive activities. A sedentary lifestyle as an independent factor predisposing a person to fracture requires further research. "- Regina Schaffer

disclosures: The authors do not report any significant financial disclosures.

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