Saturday , June 19 2021

All Blacks v Ireland: Judge Wayne Barnes defended himself after Johnny Sexton complained



Shaun Gallagher may want to skip breakfast on the morning of the test between All Blacks and Ireland.

Englishman Gallagher was appointed a commissioner for a match in Dublin on Sunday morning, and if this clash of the two best teams in the world is similar to their previous meeting in 2016, he may be busy changing.

Judge Wayne Barnes was criticized by the Irish at the forefront of the All Blacks test.

THINGS

Judge Wayne Barnes was criticized by the Irish at the forefront of the All Blacks test.

So Gallagher had the best stomach for rough things. If not, he might want to assess the allegedly impure play on his empty stomach.

Two years ago All Blacks defeated Ireland 29-9 in a brutal match at Aviva stadium, but at the expense. Black Black's midfielder, Malakai Fekitoa, received a yellow card for a high duel with Simon Zebo, and was later excluded from the game because it was considered a crime with a red card.

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All Blacks & # 39; sniper Sam Cane & # 39; were also accused, but he was not found guilty of foul play, for knocking out Robbie Henshaw in the fight when they collided with each other.

Not that the Irish were angels. Their quarterback Johnny Sexton hit Beauden Barrett with his right forearm in the jaw when he tried to score, and was lucky he was not invited to referee.

Ben Smith from New Zealand wins the fourth attempt of All Blacks against Wallabies during their rugby match at Bledisloe Cup at Nissan Stadium in Yokohama, Japan, last month.

EUGENE HOSHIKO / AP

Ben Smith from New Zealand wins the fourth attempt of All Blacks against Wallabies during their rugby match at Bledisloe Cup at Nissan Stadium in Yokohama, Japan, last month.

After the match Irish manager Michael Kearney denied that his team was moaning and tried to shed light on the motives of the opposition, saying that the citing commissioner chose 12 incidents, of which 11 concerned All Blacks.

"I do not think we're talking at all," Kearney said then. "I think the facts speak for themselves."

This is how the talk for fans from both countries in social media began. Few could have argued that Fekitoa did not deserve his ban, but Sexton should have been considered lucky.

All Black Ben Smith, who will probably be on the right wing, if head coach Steve Hansen would call the same backline in Dublin this week, guaranteed that his team would put down the hammer, but would be cautious if it were not for the judge, Wayne Barnes.

"It will be a great game, and physicality will be a big part of it," Smith said. "Yes, our discipline will be the most important for us, I am sure that they will be the same, that's only part of it."

Smith, when asked if he knew about the success after the match in 2016, did everything to imitate the blind witness at the scene of the crime. He did not say.

But Barrett, sitting next to him, crumbled: "I remember that the Irishman is also aggressive," he laughed.

This week, Sexton had an excavation at Barnes, indicating that the ref was unjustified when he controlled games involving Ireland.

"In the past, we've crossed the wrong side of Wayne & # 39; and Barnes, so it's something we'll have to look at more this week," said Sexton. Ireland, he said, played by the letter of the law, but "for whatever reason, in some games, we do not have it right with him."

Whether or not Sexton's comments prove useful or counterproductive will not be known until the game.

When All Blacks' assistant, Ian Foster, was asked if he thought that Sexton was trying to send a message to Barnes, he shrugged and said that Sexton seems to be saying a lot on the pitch.

"I'm not sure why he says so," said Foster.

"Barnsey is a great ref. Johnny seems to give them some advice in the park, so I'm sure he will continue."


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