Thursday , December 3 2020

The H7N9 virus can spread with droplets




A patient infected with bird flu H7N9 was treated last year at a hospital in Wuhan, China.
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A patient infected with bird flu H7N9 was treated last year at a hospital in Wuhan, China.
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Professor Hegang Yuyu, professor at the Institute of Medical Sciences at the University of Tokyo. Online image
Professor Hegang Yuyu, professor at the Institute of Medical Sciences at the University of Tokyo. Online image

The bird flu virus H7N9. Online image
The bird flu virus H7N9. Online image

Newspaper

Research conducted by a research team at the University of Tokyo in Japan confirmed for the first time that the H7N9 bird flu virus can spread through a cornice. Research experts are concerned that the virus has mutated into a new type of influenza virus that can trigger a global outbreak and call for an increased alert.

The research team led by Professor Heganga Yoshihiro of the Institute of Medical Sciences of the University of Tokyo, after getting infected with ferrets by the bird flu virus H7N9, discovered that the virus can be mixed in droplets of sleds and spread outside the body. To prevent the infection of further healthy ferrets, the scientists removed two ferrets from the cage for about 7 cm, after four days healthy ferrets were still infected and detected at a distance of 80 cm. Virus.
Earlier, when the bird flu virus infected mammals, it almost completely did not cover droplet infections – for the first time, the bird flu virus strain can spread through droplets. Researchers say that if bird flu genes are mutated many times, a new type of flu virus will be created that will become more susceptible to human infection.
Professor He Gang warned that the bird flu H7N9 could trigger a global epidemic and it is necessary to increase alertness and further research is necessary. The H7N9 bird flu virus confirmed the world's first case of human infection in China in 2013. To date, over 1,500 people have been infected in areas of China, mainly from birds to humans.
Hegang Yiyu specializes in the study of influenza viruses and Ebola virus and is the winner of the German medical award Robert Coho. He copied the Spanish Influenza virus from 1918 to cause panic and then created a stronger virus than the H1N1 influenza that broke out in 2009, which was criticized by the scientific community.
In addition, Mr. Chan Chan-chu, secretary of food and health in Hong Kong, stressed that the risk of avian influenza has always existed. He Bailiang, director of the Infectious Diseases and Infectious Diseases Center at the University of Hong Kong, said dozens of virus samples were highly pathogenic in human cases of H7N9 infection in the Chinese continent, causing serious infections in humans or birds. He pointed out, however, that the spread of the bird flu virus with drops is not new information – at this stage, the assessment of the risk of a bird flu virus pandemic is still low.


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